Project Templates: Difference between revisions

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Project Templates are useful for expressing information in a systematic manner, streamlining processes and saving time and energy. Templates can provide clearer communication and consistency across project. Included are templates provided by different institutions. Please contribute your project template examples to the '''[[DLF Project Managers Toolkit]]'''.  If you have examples to share, please provide some context, such as the purpose or goal, institution, teams and team size, any issues or solutions relating to the specific project template.  
Project Templates are useful for expressing information in a systematic manner, streamlining processes and saving time and energy. Templates can provide clearer communication and consistency across project. Included are templates provided by different institutions. Please contribute your project template examples to the '''[[DLF Project Managers Toolkit]]'''.  If you have examples to share, please provide some context, such as the purpose or goal, institution, teams and team size, any issues or solutions relating to the specific project template.  


=== Progress Chart ===
Kirk Wang at the UC San Diego Library developed this progress chart for students to use when QCing digitized objects.  There is conditional formatting so that once there are initials for Scanned and QC'd and there are no Deficiencies then it is considered done.  The other tab shows the progress by displaying the percentage complete.  To use this spreadsheet for your own work, simply go to '''[https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1H4My83qpOWSDMpdbDPcI_VRTjFZnBOy0W5B0xjMdlBc/edit#gid=0 Progress Chart Example]''', select File > Make a copy or Download.
Kirk Wang at the UC San Diego Library developed this progress chart for students to use when QCing digitized objects.  There is conditional formatting so that once there are initials for Scanned and QC'd and there are no Deficiencies then it is considered done.  The other tab shows the progress by displaying the percentage complete.  To use this spreadsheet for your own work, simply go to '''[https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1H4My83qpOWSDMpdbDPcI_VRTjFZnBOy0W5B0xjMdlBc/edit#gid=0 Progress Chart Example]''', select File > Make a copy or Download.


[[File:UCSDProgressChart.png|center|thumb]]
[[File:UCSDProgressChart.png|center|thumb]]

Revision as of 18:30, 12 October 2018

Project Templates are useful for expressing information in a systematic manner, streamlining processes and saving time and energy. Templates can provide clearer communication and consistency across project. Included are templates provided by different institutions. Please contribute your project template examples to the DLF Project Managers Toolkit. If you have examples to share, please provide some context, such as the purpose or goal, institution, teams and team size, any issues or solutions relating to the specific project template.

Progress Chart

Kirk Wang at the UC San Diego Library developed this progress chart for students to use when QCing digitized objects. There is conditional formatting so that once there are initials for Scanned and QC'd and there are no Deficiencies then it is considered done. The other tab shows the progress by displaying the percentage complete. To use this spreadsheet for your own work, simply go to Progress Chart Example, select File > Make a copy or Download.

UCSDProgressChart.png